Those Who Marched Along with the #WomensMarch

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With more than three million men and women who joined to walk in solidarity on Jan. 21, the Women’s March sent a strong message: Americans wouldn’t be silenced for their beliefs of equal rights. Though the number of participants was impressive and the March spread to other cities across the United States, the Twitter activity surrounding the event showed the March’s greater significance globally.

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What are people’s latest activity?

The last tweet with #WomensMarch was posted 10 days after the actual event on Jan. 31. #WomensMarch may not continue to be tweeted about, but considering the hashtag was used to chronicle a series of singular events, 10 days indicates a longer lifeline for an event-specific hashtag. Channel 4 News took note of this social media wave and created the most retweeted post with #WomensMarch, documenting how women across the nation were reacting to Trump’s recent inauguration. The hashtag may have initially related to a singular event, but with the surge of women involvement following distaste for Trump, Twitter users evidently wanted to follow along with the “trend”.

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Where are people talking?

The Women’s March on Washington was a city-centered occasion, but the #WomensMarch spread internationally, especially within North America and Europe, as the heat map shows. The United States comprised 61.1% of the conversations, followed by the United Kingdom (6.6%), Canada (4.4%), and Brazil (3.6%). Interestingly enough, within the US, the Women’s March was most tweeted about in California, followed by New York and Texas. According to the color-oriented map of the US, Washington, D.C. wasn’t in the top five states that used the hashtag the most.

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What are peopling talking about?

Looking at the buzz graph and word cloud generated by Sysomos throughout the month of January, people were primarily concern with the event, as indicated by the prominence of words “march,” “protest”, “Washington”, and “inauguration”. Specifically with the word cloud, the words that prompted the main points of discussion directly related to the event: protest, march, and inauguration. The words that branched from these points were literal variations of what the event was about: Trump and women.

Amelia Giebel

Marina Goba

Bridget Hallinan

Nisha Stickles

 

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